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Thursday, March 24, 2011

Rabbit Kin (or list of meat rabbit breeds)

Yes, I am enjoying the hickness of talking about meat rabbits. That's one thing I have run into, many city friends look at you in disgust when they find out you raise rabbits for meat.

There are several different types of meat rabbits out there. I raise mutts. Though I have discovered what they are.

Californias and Cinnamons.

Cinnamons were cross bred into creation. They are considered a commercial breed, weighing 8-11 lbs. They are a rich russet color

California are white with black on their ears and nose and have pink (mine are red) eyes. Weighing 8-10 1/2 lbs.

American Chinchilla are considered a desirable meat, with a deep loin and broad shoulder. Weighting 9-12 lbs. They also enjoyed for their thick, soft fur. It is listed as critically endangered heritage animal.


Creme D'Argents are considered a difficult breed to raise, as the are temperamental, and don't put on weight as well as other breed.Weighing 8-11 lbs.

Blanc d'Hotot is considered a dual purpose breed (pet and meat) weighing 8 -11 lbs.

New Zealand are one of the healthier breeds. It has a good snuggle bunny temperament making them easy to handle and work with. Weighing 9-12 lbs.

Palomino are considered a commercial breed though take long to grow out then others. Weighing 8-11 lbs. Have a good temperament.

Rex are another commercial breed weighing 8-9 lbs. They are raised primarily for their fur.

Sables weigh 8-10 lbs and are the Siamese cat of rabbits.

Satins are raised primarily for their fur, but do well as a commercial meat breed, weighing 9-10 lbs.

Silver fox are a fanciers breed as their numbers are low. However they make an excellent dual purpose animal (meat, fur, pet) weighing 9-12 lbs. They have a great temperament and high dress out percentage.

There are other rabbit breeds out there, many considered pet quality rather than meat.

When it comes to choosing the breed to raise it basically comes down to fur coloring. What appeals to you.

If you have a specific breed in mind, ask and I will add it to the List:

French Angora Rabbits make a good dual purpose rabbit. weighing 7-10 lbs. When looking for French angora's you want their body to be oval in shape. A good indication for a meat purpose.



For those of you that don't read comments (and I know many of you don't):

Michelle says; Keep in mind the gorgeous American Blue and White rabbits! They're a recovering-from-almost-disappearing breed developed in the US in the 1920s, and they're a friendly, cuddly, prolific meat breed.


Lynda says; The Florida Whites were a small meaty breed...the Tans were just fancy and mean! If I were raising just for meat I'd cross the NZ with the Cali's very nice for dressing out.
I would stay away from Flemish Giants (the BUBBA of the rabbit world)...I love the Flemish, they are so gentle...but they're more bone than meat and they will eat you out of house and home.

Scylla says: Standard Rex generally have a good temperament if handled regularly, but Mini Rex (weighing 2-5 pounds) are generally right little turds (i.e. not the best pets, bad on meat, worse on pelt).

Green Griffin says: Scylla that gave me a laugh about Mini Rexs. I raise them for meat. Go ahead and laugh, but they are the perfect size to feed one of my Australian Shepherds a meal. Since I feed my dogs raw, raising rabbits are a good economic choice. ( good idea Green Griffin, I myself have raised rats for feeders (not for dogs), and can some of my own dog food)

16 comments:

Donna said...

I always preferred New Zealand Whites. I love the ease of dressing rabbits. Peel 'em like a banana, gut them, eat them. Easy.

SeaMaiden said...

I've been considering getting Angora rabbits someday since I am learning to spin. They any good for eating?

Phelan said...

SeaMaiden, from what I understand, yes. French Angora Rabbits make a good dual purpose rabbit. weighing 7-10 lbs. When looking for French angora's you want their body to be oval in shape. A good indication for a meat purpose.

Michelle said...

Keep in mind the gorgeous American Blue and White rabbits! They're a recovering-from-almost-disappearing breed developed in the US in the 1920s, and they're a friendly, cuddly, prolific meat breed. I have Americans, Californians, Cinnamons, and Cremes, and I agree with your assessment of the Cremes - they're my most challenging breed. Pretty, though....

Lynda said...

I raised rabbits for show for years. My show breeds were Tans and Florida Whites. I also raised English and French Angoras to spin. You can eat all rabbits. The French Angora's are *meatier* than the English...but I loved the wool on the English for spinning. The Florida Whites were a small meaty breed...the Tans were just fancy and mean! If I were raising just for meat I'd cross the NZ with the Cali's very nice for dressing out.
I would stay away from Flemish Giants (the BUBBA of the rabbit world)...I love the Flemish, they are so gentle...but they're more bone than meat and they will eat you out of house and home.

Bombdigity said...

its posts like these that make me wish we lived nearby ... in Vegas, raising anything as meat gets dirty looks, so glad we're moving to Kentucky lol

thanks for this post!!

Phelan said...

Thank you for the info ladies. Have added it and credited, in this post.

vegetable garden cook said...

I raise American Chinchillas. We haven't had the heart to eat them yet, but have sold many of their offspring. They are incredibly sweet animals.

Annette said...

Thank you for this list! The rabbits I'm getting are a cal/AC mix. Kind of wish I could find pure AC to continue the breed.
Anyway, I finally got to see a giant flemish and they are HUGE! I can see where they would eat you out of house and home. *whew*

Scylla said...

My family extensively raised Standard Rex rabbits in a wide range of colors - they are an EXCELLENT dual-purpose breed.

The skins don't fetch much to commercial tanneries, but if one learns to DIY, leather-supply shoppes will often happily buy them direct at a much better price.

Standard Rex generally have a good temperament if handled regularly, but Mini Rex (weighing 2-5 pounds) are generally right little turds (i.e. not the best pets, bad on meat, worse on pelt).

Terri said...

We have two Flemish Giants does that are my pets. We have French Angoras for spinning wool and meat. We have a total of two senior does and two senior bucks. We currently have fourteen kits from three litters. We did have another senior doe but her attitude landed her on the dinner table.

It was the first rabbit that I had eaten. It was better than I thought. We want to be more self sufficent so this is our first small step.

Green Griffin said...

LOL, @scylla that gave me a laugh about Mini Rexs. I raise them for meat. Go ahead and laugh, but they are the perfect size to feed one of my Australian Shepherds a meal. Since I feed my dogs raw, raising rabbits are a good economic choice. With a backyard warren, I can feed my dogs one meal a week of conejo. Yes, we get the strangest looks when we say we are raising lovely velveteen rabbits for eatin.

Phelan said...

haha! ok I was going to ask what mini rexes were good for then, but I think I have my answer.

Parker said...

I'd say my favorites are the various mixes I have gathered. Some are better for meat by build, but they all have terrific personalities - gentle and curious, and playful. For meat purposes though, I'm going to stick with my larger pure Standard Rex. They are calm, gorgeous, have the most satiny coats, and have a good meaty build. My smaller purebred rabbits, like the incredibly intelligent Havanas and skittish Satins, are too good at squeezing out of their pen and I'm tired of catching them!
Whiiiiiine. Phalen, I need you and your husbands' carpentry skills!
Parker

Phelan said...

Hey parker, did you see my temp rabbit cage and instruction on flickr? A stable gun goes a long way. It takes a bit of practice, but you will get there.

Kim said...

My husband and I raise American Chinchillas and several breeds of angoras. The AmChins make delicious eating, have easy-going personalities, and excellent grow-out times. Most angoras a decent meals, but put a lot of their energy into producing wool rather than a meaty body. Stick to the true MEAT rabbits for the best return for your feed dollar. If you want something to hug, and have excellent wool to spin, go for Angoras!!!
www.hippityhoprabbitry.weebly.com

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